Archive for the ‘irish’ Tag

~~ HAPPY ST. PATRICK’S DAY ! ~~   5 comments

 

 

Know that ye can’t kiss an Irish lass by surprise,

only just sooner than she thought ye might ! 

…and now ’til day be done,

may yer day be filled wi’ Irish fun !

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Lá Shona Fhéile Pádraig go léir!
Sláinte ag!

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Posted March 17, 2017 by PapaBear in Experiences, holiday, Humor, Poetry, Uncategorized

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A Bit o’ Humor   Leave a comment

 

An Irishman was flustered not being able to find a parking space in a large mall’s parking lot.

“Lord,”he prayed, I can’t stand this. If you open a space up for me, I swear I’ll give up drinking me whiskey, and I promise to go to church every Sunday.”

Suddenly, the clouds parted and the sun shone on an empty parking spot.

Without hesitation, the man said, “Never mind, I found one.”

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What do you call an Irishman sitting on a couch? “Paddy O’Furniture”

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A Swiss man, on holiday in Dublin, needed directions. He was standing outside Davy Byrne’s pub when he saw two youths walking by so he stops them and asks,  ‘Entschuldigung, koennen Sie Deutsch sprechen?’

The two lads look at each other blankly and stare back at him.

‘Excusez-moi, parlez vous Français?’ He tries.

The two continue to stare.

‘Parlare Italiano?’ Still absolutely no response from the two lads.

‘Hablan ustedes Espanol?’ The Dublin lads remain totally silent.

The Swiss guy walks off extremely disappointed and downhearted that he had not been understood.  One of the boys turns to the second and says, ‘Y’know, maybe we should learn a foreign language!’

‘Why?’ says the youth, ‘That guy knew four languages, and it didn’t do him any good!’

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Y’all needed a smile for the day….., didn’t ya ?????

 

Posted December 12, 2016 by PapaBear in Humor, Prose

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~~ Oiche Maith ~~   2 comments

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With the onset o’ St. Patrick’s Day I thought to leave you wi’ a bit o’ humor t’night and hope that yer e’en’ be light. Here be a smile or two for ye !

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Father O’ Malley answers the phone.

‘Hello, is this Father O’Malley?’
‘It is’
‘This is the Inland Revenue Service, income tax department. Can you help us?’
‘I can.’
‘Do you know a Ted Houlihan?’
‘I do’
‘Is he a member of your congregation?’

He is’
‘Did he donate $10,000 to the church?’

‘He will.’

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What do you call an Irishman who keeps bouncing off of walls?
Rick O’ Shea!
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GOOD NIGHT EVERYBODY

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Posted March 10, 2016 by PapaBear in Humor, Personal, Uncategorized

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~ A Touch o’ Humor ~   5 comments

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Five Englishmen in an Audi Quattro arrived at an Irish border checkpoint. Paddy, the officer, stops them and tells them: “It is illegal to put five people in a Quattro. Quattro means four.”

“Quattro is just the name of the automobile,” the Englishman retorted disbelievingly. “Look at the papers: this car is designed to carry five persons.”

“You cannot pull that one on me,” replies Paddy. “Quattro means four. You have five people in your car and you are therefore breaking the law.”


“You idiot!” the Englishmen replies angrily. “Call your supervisor over. I want to speak to someone with more intelligence!”

“Sorry,” responds Paddy, “Murphy is busy with two guys in a Fiat Uno.”

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Good Night Everybody !

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Posted November 6, 2015 by PapaBear in Humor, Prose, Story

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A Bit More o’ Irish Fun   2 comments

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St.-Patrick[1]

To most people, St. Patrick is the man who brought a day of good times and green beer to pubs across the world. In reality, St. Patrick wasn’t made a saint until centuries after his death and he wasn’t even Irish. St. Patrick was born in Britain to a wealthy family. During his childhood, he was kidnapped and sold into slavery in Ireland. During his years in slavery he converted to Christianity and once freed he did spend the rest of his life teaching the Irish about the Christian religion, but he was soon forgotten after his death. It wasn’t until many years later that monks began telling the tale of St. Patrick forcing all the snakes out of Ireland. Something he never could have done as there never were any snakes in Ireland.

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Dagdas-Harp[1]

In Irish mythology, the Dagda was a high priest who had a large and beautiful harp. During a war, a rival tribe stole Dagda’s harp and took it to an abandoned castle. Dagda followed the tribe and called to the harp. The harp came to Dagda and he struck the chords. The harp let out the Music of Tears and everyone in the castle began to cry. Dagda struck the chords again and the harp played the Music of Mirth and all the warriors began to laugh. Then, Dagda struck the chords a final time and the harp let out the Music of Sleep. Everyone but Dagda fell into a deep sleep, allowing him to escape with his magical harp unharmed.

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The Shamrock

The three green leaves of the Shamrock is more than the unofficial symbol of Ireland and one of the marshmallows in Lucky Charms. The Shamrock has held meaning to most of Ireland’s historic cultures. The Druids believed the Shamrock was a sacred plant that could ward off evil. The Celtics believed the Shamrock had mystical properties due to the plant’s three heart-shaped leaves. The Celtics believed three was a sacred number. Some Christians also believed the Shamrock had special meaning- the three leaves representing the Holy Trinity.

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The Tuatha de Danann, the people of the Goddess Danu, were one of the great ancient tribes of Ireland. The important manuscript ‘The Annals of the Four Masters’, records that they ruled Ireland from 1897 B.C. to 1700 B.C.

The arrival of the tribe in Ireland is the stuff of legend. They landed at the Connaught coastline and emerged from a great mist. It is speculated that they burned their boats to ensure that they settled down in their new land. The rulers of Ireland at the time were the Fir Bolg, led by Eochid son of Erc, who was, needless to say, unhappy about the new arrivals.

The Tuatha de Danann won the inevitable battle with the Fir Bolg but, out of respect for the manner in which they had fought, they allowed the Fir Bolg to remain in Connaught while the victors ruled the rest of Ireland.

The new rulers of Ireland were a civilised and cultured people. The new skills and traditions that they introduced into Ireland were held in high regard by the peoples they conquered. They had four great treasures (or talismans) that demonstrated their skills. The first was the ‘Stone of Fal’ which would scream when a true King of Ireland stood on it. It was later placed on the Hill of Tara, the seat of the High-Kings of Ireland. The second was the ‘Magic Sword of Nuadha’, which was capable of inflicting only mortal blows when used. The third was the ‘sling-shot of the Sun God Lugh’, famed for its accuracy when used. The final treasure was the ‘Cauldron of Daghda’ from which an endless supply of food issued.

The original leader of the Tuatha was Nuada but, having lost an arm in battle it was decreed that he could not rightly be king. That honour went to Breas, a tribesman of Fomorian descent. His seven year rule was not a happy one however, and he was ousted by his people who had become disenchanted with hunger and dissent. Nuada was installed as King, resplendent with his replacement arm made from silver.

Breas raised an army of Fomorians based in the Hebrides and they battled with Nuada at Moytura in County Sligo. The Tuatha again prevailed and the power of the Fomorians was broken forever. The victory had cost the Tuatha their King as Nuadha had died in the battle. A hero of the conflict named Lugh was instated as the new King of Ireland.

The grandsons of the next King, Daghda, ruled during the invasion by the mighty Melesians. The Tuatha de Danann were defeated and consigned to mythology. Legend has it that they were allowed to stay in Ireland, but only underground. Thus they became the bearers of the fairies of Ireland, consigned to the underworld where they became known as ‘Aes sidhe’ (the people of the mound – fairy mounds).

The Melieians used the name of one of the Tuatha de Danann gods, Eriu, as the name of their new kingdom. Eriu or Eire is still used in modern times as the name of Ireland.

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Just a wee bit o’ Irish fun

Before th’ day’s officially begun

Cabbage ‘n’ good corned beef

Decorated with a shamrock’s leaf

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Now, ’tis time for a glass o’ Guiness

Slainte !

…and G’nite to one ‘n’ all !

Posted March 16, 2015 by PapaBear in History, Humor, Poetry, Prose, Story

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An Irish Valetine   4 comments

Ah, I know I’m a wee bit early but…..

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Happy St. Valentine’s Day

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Bealtaine an blessings an ghrá, ar an lá seo,

a showered ar fad agat agus mise,

as an gcroí de dom agus mianach.

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May the blessings of love, this day,

be showered on all of you and yours,

from the hearts of me and mine.

Photo-by-Konstantinos-Papakonstantinou[1]

Slainte !!!

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Posted February 8, 2015 by PapaBear in A Little Romance, Personal, Poetry

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~~ Nollaig Shona Duit ~~   Leave a comment

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The Gaelic greeting for ‘Merry Christmas’ is:
‘Nollaig Shona Duit’
……which is pronounced as ‘null-ig hun-a dit’.

Holly is a traditional Irish decoration for the home.  As it was plentiful, both rich and poor alike used it to decorate for the Yule season.

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All decorations are traditionally taken down on Little Christmas (January 6th.) and it is considered to be bad luck to take them down beforehand.

Nollaig na mBan (pronounced null-ag na man) and is celebrated on January 6th

January 6, the Feast of the Epiphany, is traditionally when the Irish finish celebrating Christmas. Tradition has it that women get the day off and the men of the house get to do the housework, cooking and take down the Christmas decorations. Women meet up, have a day out and treat themselves.

 

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Merry Christmas & Happy New Year

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Posted December 14, 2014 by PapaBear in Experiences, Family, History, Personal, Prose

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